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Policing The Framerate Police

In the past week, there has been a growing controversy over the new steam curator group The Framerate Police. Started by notable PC gaming critic John Bain A.K.A. Totalbiscuit, the curator group is meant to be a purely objective tool for consumers to utilize when deciding whether to purchase a title or not. It highlights titles on PC that are either hard locked or generally hover around 30 frames per second during gameplay and suggests workarounds and fixes where applicable. While anyone who primarily uses consoles generally won't have a need for the group, it is the feeling of many who use PC that 60 FPS should be the standard, especially if their hardware is capable of attaining such frame rates.

 

framerate police

Not everyone is convinced of the supposedly objective purpose of this group however, with many voicing concerns that it exists solely to shame developers. With many suffering from limited resources, or simply making games in genres not wholly dependent on lush graphics or smooth real-time gameplay, and facing backlash if they end up on the list, their concerns aren't going un-noticed. Total Biscuit eventually had to step in and write a post condemning a torrent of trolling behaviour directed towards a developer who had blocked the curator from its store page.

It's worth pointing out that if Valve hadn't blocked tags like 30 FPS, or other tags that listed consumer concerns over genre characteristics, then the Framerate Police might not have been necessary. Regardless, in the current atmosphere of anti-consumer practices by gaming media and the industry, and efforts to work around and even counteract them, this group's existence has become something of a bastion of consumer rights. The backlash against such rights, however justified in the minds of the people who purvey it, can only serve to inform gamers of which games, and by extension developers, to support with their hard earned money.

Let us know what you think about the Framerate Police and its impact on developers by leaving a comment down below.

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Kyle Arsenault is an avid gaming critic/composer who yearns to share the greatness of gaming with the world. He also likes nachos.